Climate change could threaten our beer

OK, now it's getting serious.

Enough is enough!

Enough is enough!

We all know that climate change is threatening our environment.  And our economies.  And our livelihoods. 

But now it appears that climate change could imperil the very foundations of our society.

Our beer.

That's right -- in a recent meeting with Australian Green Party Leader, Senator Christine Milne, researcher Peter Gous emphasized the likely impacts of global warming on beer production.

"It only takes one hot day" to destroy a crop of grain, said Gous.

This is a frightening prospect given that state-of-the-art climate models project up to a 1.5-degree Centigrade (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) increase in average temperature by 2030. 

Add that on top of your average heat-wave, and you could get a serious crop-killer.

This is just one example of the complex -- and often highly disturbing -- ways that climate change could affect our future.

A forthcoming book, Climate Peril, by author John J. Berger, attempts to tease out many of these potentially alarming effects -- on nature, the economy, human health, society, and national security.

According to Berger, we're missing the boat by failing to consider critical interrelationships among effects such as drought, fire, disease, water shortages, habitat destruction, endangered species, resource collapse, energy production, and the economy.

Although a top-flight scientist and energy expert, Berger's book is remarkably easy to read. 

He argues at the outset that there's almost no way we're going to limit global warming to a 2-degree Centigrade (3.6-degree Fahrenheit) increase in average temperature, as many have hoped.

He then shows, again and again, how climate change is likely to provoke cascades of destabilizing changes.

To select just one from a wealth of examples: a strong drought can destroy crops and livestock, which in turn impacts on food processors, farm-equipment suppliers, and labor markets. 

This in turn can grind down local and regional economies, depressing real-estate values.

And this can then force economically stressed people to migrate elsewhere, weakening the social fabric of a community, harming mental and physical health, and promoting domestic violence.

Berger's book is one of the very best I've seen on climate change -- on understanding how it could impact on virtually every facet of our life, society, economy, and environment.

There's a lot more at stake here than just our beer.

 

Across the planet, big trees are in trouble

We all know that big animals such as elephants, rhinos and tigers are in trouble, but it turns out that the fate of our largest and oldest trees is just as dire.

Everywhere you look, big trees are hurting (photo by William Laurance)

Everywhere you look, big trees are hurting (photo by William Laurance)

All across the world, big trees are suffering.  They are being cleared for agriculture, felled by loggers, and are dying as a result of habitat fragmentation, exotic pests and pathogens, altered fire regimes, and severe droughts. 

Big trees are adapted for longevity and stability--two things in short supply in our rapidly changing world.

I first wrote about the dire fate of big trees in early 2012, in New Scientist.  That was followed by papers in Science in 2012 and Conservation Letters in 2013, in collaboration with leading ecologists David Lindenmayer and Jerry Franklin. 

Now there's more evidence of the vulnerability of big trees, from the Amazon.  Plinio Sist and colleagues have just found that many big trees are being damaged during selective logging operations there, and die soon afterward.  This is on top of the big trees that are actually being harvested.  The post-logging wave of tree death has a serious impact on the carbon storage and ecology of the forest.

It's increasing looking like big trees are an important barometer of Earth's environmental 'health'.

-Bill Laurance